We don’t get to talk so much about our failures, do we?

 

I mean, who wants to read about how you failed and did something that wasn’t winning?

 

Who cares about how your business idea was a huge fail or how you had to sit for an external examination seven times in a row or how you got heartbroken or how you applied for a job and got rejected or how you auditioned for a role and didn’t get selected?

 

Our world is so into success stories to the extent that we’ve neglected failures and progress stories (that are not entirely about how you excelled all the time) as one of those things that count.

 

But speaking of failures, here’s a failure episode from my life you might want to read.

 

A tale of how I got an unforgettable but not-so-pleasant memory.

 

Of how I stood.

 

Mic in hand.

 

A myriad of bulging human eyes fixed on me.

 

The hall, placid and tranquil.

 

My being, tensed.

 

And all I had rehearsed for my presentation, forgotten.

 

Obviously, I felt so embarrassed.

 

Got home and couldn’t stop thinking about what all had happened and wishing I could take back the hands of time and do things a bit differently. But we just can’t do that, can we?

 

But here lies the crux of this tale:

 

Do not let the plethora of success stories you see online push you into thinking that if you don’t get it right and perfectly then your story doesn’t need to be heard.

 

It broke my heart when a friend of mine who writes so well told me he was waiting till he got really good at writing before he would begin putting out his works for the world to see. No doubt, this is the fate of so many other people out there.

 

Of you reading this, maybe.

 

You have a business idea and you’re waiting till you are convinced of zero risks.

 

You have a craft you’re good at and you’re waiting till you can deliver flawlessly before you start showing up.

 

Come on, now.

 

Salem King would say: “Journey over Destination”.

 

It doesn’t matter when you get to where you’re going to, it is the progressive little steps you take that matters even more.

 

Imagine trying to cut down a tree with an axe.

 

Let’s say it takes 7 hits to cut down that tree. For the first six attempts you would look stupid and it would feel as though you’re wasting your time. But with the seventh hit, the tree comes falling down and it all makes sense.

 

Be aware that it is not the seventh hit that made the difference, but instead it is the six consistent hits before that.

 

So, dear young person,

 

As much as success stories are an interesting read, we want to watch you grow into that star we know you are.

Own your failures. Own your progress story. Own your six hits.

 

It may not look like you’re getting anywhere with it now. It may not be making much sense. But when that seventh hit comes, you’d be glad you persisted.

 

Just as Winston Churchill said, “success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts.”

 

Remember, someone’s counting on you.

 

I’m counting on you.

 

We all are.

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